Cuckoo Scots Dumpy, Best 6 Good Side

Cuckoo Scots dumpy is a traditional Scottish breed of chicken that is thought to have been developed in the 1830s by early settlers from England and Holland, who brought a new variety of poultry to the Scottish countryside. The cuckoo scots dumpy is a dual-purpose chicken that can lay eggs and produce meat, which makes them well-suited for self-sufficiency.

The breed is known for laying shades of blue-green eggs, which is why they are sometimes called “blue eggs”. Cuckoo Scots dumpy is also known as lucky scots, cuckoo Cochins, cut Cochins, dumpy cochin, and dumpy cochin bantams.

How to identify cuckoo scots dumpy?

Cuckoo Scots dumpy is a large, plump, and long-legged breed. They are recognized by their dark-blue egg color, often with dark speckling.

Cuckoo Scots Dumpy hen
Cuckoo Scots Dumpy hen

The hens may have an all-white or golden-buff-colored skin with black earlobes and wattles. They have yellow skin around the eyes and along the back of the head and neck. Cuckoo Scot’s dumpy cocks have single combs and red wattles over their eyes.

Behavioral characteristics

Cuckoo Scots dumpy are very hardy, docile hens that are well-suited for both free-range and confinement housing. They are tolerant even when confined with other breeds and lay well in cold weather. Cuckoo Scot’s dumpy hens lay about 200 medium-sized brown eggs per year and forage for insects and seeds. They are a docile breed but can be aggressive when defending their nests from predators.

Uses

Cuckoo Scot’s dumpies are popular foraging and backyard chickens because of their dual purpose, laying, and meat qualities. In addition to the commonly seen blue-green egg color, they lay brown eggs.

Housing requirements

Cuckoo Scots dumpy are well-suited to free-range, but they do well in confinement housing. They do not need a lot of room to roam, but they also do well in small areas where they can be protected from predators and enjoy fresh grass or grain in confinement.

As pet

Cuckoo Scots dumpy is an excellent choice for children as pets. They are quiet and undemanding, which makes them perfect for kids who are learning to enjoy the responsibility of a pet.

In the backyard

Cuckoo Scot’s dumpy hens lay well in cold weather and tolerate confinement very well.

Health issue

Cuckoo Scots dumpy are susceptible to the same problems as other small-framed chickens and can develop mild to serious health problems. They can suffer from egg binding, heat stress, and respiratory infections due to their long legs, which makes them more prone to parasites.

Colored eggs, when laid in warm weather, may carry Salmonella. The keepers of the cuckoo scots dumpy must use proper biosecurity measures to prevent the spread of disease. Cuckoo Scots dumpy are very hardy and well-suited for freedom in the backyard, but they should be kept away from predators.

Special Considerations

These chickens need to be kept warm in colder climates, such as Northern California. They can withstand the cold, but they need protection from the wind. They are hardy as they can tolerate cool temperatures, but they cannot tolerate extreme heat. They should be provided with a good layer of litter and plenty of room to scratch.

Best 6 Good side

  • The breed has many colors of eggs
  • Innate tendency to forage for seeds and insects
  • Tolerant of warmer weather and confinement housing
  • Mature young cocks show aggressive behavior towards each other
  • Good egg producer
  • Suited for free-range and confinement housing

Bad side

Conclusion

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1 thought on “Cuckoo Scots Dumpy, Best 6 Good Side”

  1. I was lucky enough, after searching for 7 years to purchase some scots dumpy eggs. I hatched out 12 peeps in may 2021 and thus began my start to breeding these endangered birds. In my research I have never come across references to blue-green eggs accept for this article… my hens lay very pale brown or off white eggs. This could be from introduced genetics from others chickens when the effort to increase population began. And also none of my roosters have shown aggression towards one another and I have kept two from the same hatchings in each pen together. One will show dominance, the other extreme submissiveness, but no fighting unless a third rooster gets out and goes near their pens. The roosters tend to be more confident and less flighty towards humans than the hens, I’ve noticed. The shortness of the legs varies slightly, your looking for no more than 1 to 1.5 inches, and the long legged ones I dub “ scots stilties “ because the legs are so long. I live near Charlottesville Virginia and they do well in all four seasons, but I do see egg production decrease in extremely hot weather. They can get loud, sometimes be difficult to catch, but overall they are friendly, inquisitive chickens with such adorable stature and purpose I hope to see more interest in them over the years and their numbers increase.

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